Why BlogPaws?

On a sunny May morning in 2010, I pulled into a gas station somewhere between Bloomington, IN, and Columbus, OH. I pulled out my phone while the tank filled. I spotted a ton of tweets from other folks who were on their way to the first ever BlogPaws conference.

I actually considered NOT tweeting that I was on my way, too, because I felt like such a fraud. Who was I to be going to a social media conference? Who was I–a blogger with less than a year under her belt–to think I could hold my own in a professional crowd?

Of course, it all turned out fine, despite myriad doubts and fears and insecurities. In fact, it turned out great. Some of the dearest friends and most important people in my life today were friendships formed at that first BlogPaws. I learned a ton, though I was incredibly intimidated. I vividly remember hearing a speaker say that you can’t really make any money at the blogging game until you have at least 5,000 followers. I balked. At the time, I don’t think I had more than 50 or 100 readers at that time. Not per day. Not per week. Per month!

Since then, since BlogPaws 2010, I’ve topped 20,000. I credit my herd with that growth because they’re the ones who give me the stories to tell. But, I also credit BlogPaws–not just the speakers and sessions and keynotes, but the relationships formed. If I have a WordPress question or need a contact at a PR agency, or if I just need someone to cry on the phone with (which I did when Lucas was diagnosed with cancer), that community is there.

Sure, BlogPaws isn’t perfect. But there’s truly no other organization like it, and we can all improve if we work together in constructive, positive ways.

We’re lucky: We’re in two growth industries. The pet industry has become a massive, innovative behemoth, and the blogosphere continues to expand and develop. Both industries are primed for development. We, as pet bloggers and social media influencers, are in position to lead, to direct the future of both capacities.

We have that power.

And that’s why I go to BlogPaws.

Join me?

BlogPaws 2015 and eBook News!

I’ve attended all but one of the annual BlogPaws conferences (darn chemo ruined my perfect record), and this year’s was a remarkable experience. They’re all wonderful, of course, but this was the first year I got to speak.

Maggie Marton speaking at BlogPaws

That’s me. Speaking.

I need a haircut.

Anyway, it was an absolute pleasure to chat about authenticity in blogging.

I truly believe that the key to long-term success is being completely, wholly true to YOU with your blog.

In a cluttered online environment, discerning readers can pick out who’s being honest and forthright versus those bloggers who are just shilling. That isn’t to say you can’t earn money on your blog; you can and absolutely should–as long as you’re doing it authentically. If fact, being authentic increases your earning potential.

On that note, I’m thrilled to announce my eBook on being an authentic blogger. If you’re looking to grow your blog, expand your reach, and do so while staying true to YOU, this one’s for you! 

Here’s What Happened at BlogPaws

I had a fabulous time at the BlogPaws conference last week. I learned so much about behind-the-scenes social media planning and content strategy, and I spent the entire time surrounded by a brilliant group of women. I tried to soak up everything I could over those four days. As I combed through my notes on the flight home, I realized a few key themes emerged.BlogPaws 2014 recap

Here are my top three takeaways from BlogPaws 2014:

1. Tell a story. This point was made in numerous sessions. Readers want a story. Even if you’re writing a product review, turn it into a tale. People want to be entertained, so find a way to turn every blog post, tweet, and status update into a story.

2. Diversify. Don’t build your house on another man’s land, right? This holds true for social media platforms. After Facebook’s big algorithm change, a number of content developers experienced a hit. If you’re diversified and have a presence – and, ideally, an audience! – in several spaces, changes like that won’t impact you as negatively. However, your main hub has to be your own website. That’s your land.

3. Collaborate. This point wasn’t ever overtly stated, but so many speakers mentioned that, as writers and bloggers, many of us work alone. Ok, so our dogs are our colleagues, but they’re not particularly helpful when it comes to WordPress widgets or social media strategy. One speaker suggested finding an accountability partner. Another said to assemble a tribe – either online or off – who will give you honest feedback. One of the more techie speakers suggested finding local meetups of folks who are working on the same platforms as you are so you can share tips and tricks. Whatever route you take, it’s important to find someone you trust.

Overall, the conference was incredible. I learned a ton and met some amazing people. I hung out with old friends and made many new friends, too! I already can’t wait until next year.